Hawaiian Pothos

Hey there, plant lovers! If you’re looking for a low-maintenance houseplant that’s easy to care for and grows quickly, then you’ll love Hawaiian Pothos

Hawaiian-Potho Plant

Hawaiian Potho is a beautiful and unique plant that is very easy to look after. This beautiful plant is characterized by its large, glossy leaves, which are bright green with streaks of white that grow fast and are tolerant of some neglect. The green and white variegated leaves are heart-shaped and look great in any indoor garden. Hawaiian Pothos is similar in many respects to the golden and giant Pothos varieties but is much easier to look after.

Furthermore, Epipremnum aureum ‘Hawaiian’ is a popular plant for those who want to add a touch of the tropics to their home or office. With its bright green leaves and striking gold streaks, Pothos is sure to make a statement in any setting.

It is a fast-growing plant that is easy to care for, making it a popular choice for both indoor and outdoor spaces. One of the most unique things about Hawaiian pothos is their ability to thrive in a wide range of conditions.

Pothos Varieties: Baltic Blue PothosGlacier Pothos

Summary of Epipremnum aureum ‘Hawaiian’

Botanical Name
Epipremnum aureum ‘Hawaiian’
Light needs:   
Moderate diffuse light
Watering needs:       
Check soil and water if top 2 inches is dry.
Fertilizer:       
Fertilize once from early spring to summer
Soil:    
Well-draining
Humidity:      
50 % to 70%
Temperature:
64-77°F (18°C to 25°C)
Where to buy:
Walmart or Rare Plant Shops or Etsy.
Common issues:        Burning of variegated parts of the leaves, yellowing of the leaves

What Is the Origin of Epipremnum aureum ‘Hawaiian’

These eye-catcher Pothos plants are native to the tropical forests of French Polynesia, where they can grow to be massive plants with leaves split down the sides. furthermore, If you’re growing pothos plants indoors, it’s important to keep them contained to avoid them damaging local habitats.

What’s so special about Hawaiian pothos?

Pothos Hawaiian plants are known for their lush, tropical jungle look. And Hawaiian pothos is no exception! This beautiful plant is characterized by its large, glossy leaves, which are bright green with streaks of gold. It’s the perfect addition to any home or office and can either be trailed from a hanging basket or trailed-up support.

So what makes Hawaiian pothos so special? Here are a few things that set it apart from other pothos varieties:

  • It’s native to Hawaii.
  • It’s one of the most drought-tolerant pothos varieties.
  • It’s relatively resistant to pests and disease.
  • It’s easy to care for and maintain.

How to take care of Hawaiian Pothos?

Hawaiian Pothos will thrive and provide you with years of enjoyment. Be sure to put it in a location that meets its temperature and humidity requirements and give it a little fertilizer in the spring and summer. With a little bit of love, your pothos will be a beautiful addition to your home.

Light and watering of Hawaiian Pothos

Devil’s ivy Watering and light requirements

How much light does Hawaiian pothos need?

As a general rule, Pothos plants do best in medium indirect sunlight. They will tolerate some low-light conditions, but the variegation on the leaves will suffer over time in lower-light areas. but the lower light will cause the variegation (pattern of light and dark coloring) to fade over time. If you want to keep your Pothos looking their best, it’s best to keep moving them around, from low light to lots of light, and back again.

If you are growing Pothos plants indoors, it is best to keep them in an area where they will receive some bright indirect sunlight for at least part of the day. If you do not have a spot like this in your home, you can try moving them around from time to time, so that they get a chance to grow in brighter and lower light conditions.

watering:

As far as watering goes, Pothos is pretty drought-tolerant. Allow the soil to dry out somewhat between watering, and be careful not to overwater. In brighter light conditions, Pothos will require more water than in lower light. Just be sure to water them regularly, especially when you move them to a brighter spot, as they will need more moisture in these conditions.

So, to summarize, the best light conditions for Pothos are medium indirect sunlight. They will do well in some low-light conditions, but for the best results, keep moving them around and give them a little extra water in brighter light.

Humidifier maintaining moisture level around the plant atmosphere

What humidity does Hawaiian pothos need?

Hawaiian pothos doesn’t require high humidity, they do prefer to flourish in 50 % to 70 % moisture. If your home is dry, you can increase the humidity around your pothos by grouping them with other plants, using a pebble tray, or misting it regularly.

Buy a plant humidifier to maintain the humidity level for this Hawaiian beauty.

As houseplants, Pothos plants are very popular due to their easy care and tolerance of a wide range of conditions. However, it's important to remember that they are still wild plants at heart and can cause serious damage to local ecosystems if left to grow unchecked.
As houseplants, Pothos plants are very popular due to their easy care and tolerance of a wide range of conditions. However, it’s important to remember that they are still wild plants at heart and can cause serious damage to local ecosystems if left to grow unchecked.

Fertilizing Hawaiian Pothos

When it comes to fertilizing your Hawaiian pothos, you’ll want to do so in spring and summer, using a balanced liquid fertilizer every two weeks. However, be careful not to add too much as over-fertilizing will burn the leaves.  The fertilizer should contain nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium in order to provide your plant with the nutrients it needs to thrive. Just be careful not to add too much fertilizer, as this can burn the leaves of your plant.

Potting soil for Hawaiian Pothos plant

In the world of potting soils, there are a few things that you want to look for when it comes to finding the perfect mix for your Hawaiian Pothos, make sure you’re using a well-draining mix. you can buy commercial soil or make your own.

When making your own potting mix, I recommend using:

  • 55% coco coir.
  • 20% perlite, pumice, coarse sand, small wood chips, or shredded wood fiber.
  • slow-release fertilizer or 25% organic compost or worm castings.

The bark and perlite will help to keep things extra airy and prevent compaction and waterlogging.

How Does Hawaiian Pothos Get Big Leaves?
The leaves of Hawaiian pothos can get up to 12 inches long, but they’re usually a bit smaller. If you want your pothos to have big leaves, make sure it’s getting enough light and fertilizer.

Pruning of devil’s ivy Pothos plant

The more you prune, the healthier and more attractive your plant will be!

That’s why we’re here to talk about pruning and maintenance for fast-growing plants. Remember that regular pruning is an important part of plant care, especially for Baltic blue pothos.

Pothos plants are very easy to care for and one of the most important things you can do for them is to keep them trimmed and under control. Pruning your pothos plant on a regular basis will help to keep its size and shape in check, and also encourage new growth.

First and foremost, you need to be aware of the size and shape that you want your plant to be. This will help you determine how often you need to prune it, as well as where you need to make the cut. When it comes to the actual pruning, you want to make sure that you’re snipping above the leaf nodes. (The point where leaves and stems meet) to encourage branching and new growth. prune carefully not to damage the stem. Always sterilize your pruning tools before using them on Hawaiian Pothos plants, as infected or diseased tools can spread diseases and pests, simply wiping the blades down with rubbing alcohol or a bleach solution will do the trick.

So why not give your Hawaiian pothos a little TLC and give it a good pruning? Your plant will thank you for it!

Propagation of Hawaiian Pothos plant

Hawaiian Pothos plant can be easily propagated through water or soil.

To propagate in water

  • First, you’ll need a healthy plant to take your cutting from.
  • simply cut a stem just below a leaf node.
  • place it in a jar or vase of water.
  • roots should form within a few weeks.
  • Once the roots are several inches long.
  • transplant the cutting into the soil.
  • After the plant has germinated, transfer it to a larger pot.

To propagate in soil

Simply pot a stem cutting in a moist potting mix. Keep the soil moist but not soggy and new roots should form within a few weeks. Let the cutting adjust to its new pot for a week or so, then transfer it to a larger pot once it has germinated.

Repotting Hawaiian Pothos plant

It’s time to repot your Hawaiian pothos when the roots of the plant start emerging from the sides of the soil in the pot and begin to creep through the drainage holes. Here’s a helpful guide on how to repot a Hawaiian pothos:

Follow these steps to repot your Baltic Blue Pothos.

  • Select a clean, level surface on which to work.
  • Invert the pot to release the plant.
  • Carefully hold the plant and pull it out from the pot.
  • Examine the roots and snip away any that are rotted or damaged.
  • Fill the new pot with wet soil.
  • Make a deep depression in the soil
  • Place the plant roots in the same dept as it was before in the previous pot.
  • Cover the roots completely with moist soil.
  • Keep the plant in a shady place to help it adjust to its new home.

Hawaiian Pothos Common Problem

Common problems with Hawaiian Pothos include browning or yellowing leaves, wilting, and leaf drop. These problems are typically caused by incorrect watering, too much or too little light, or poor drainage.

Brown or yellow leaves

Overwatering is the most common problem, as pothos are susceptible to root rot. Be sure to allow the soil to dry out somewhat between waterings. Brown leaves can also indicate overwatering, as well as too much fertilizer, low humidity, or drafts. If the leaves of your pothos start to turn yellow, this can indicate too much direct sunlight or a lack of nutrients.

Pests & Diseases

Diseases

Pothos are relatively resistant to pests and diseases, but they can occasionally be bothered by mealybugs, scale, or spider mites. If you notice any of these pests on your pothos, you can treat them with a pesticide or insecticide. As with any plant, it is also important to keep an eye out for any signs of disease, such as yellowing or wilting leaves, brown spots, or mushy stems. If you notice any of these problems, be sure to isolate the affected plant and use pesticides or neem oil.

Treatments for pests and diseases will vary depending on the problem, so be sure to consult a professional before taking any action.

What Are the Potential Impacts of Pothos Plants on the Environment?

As houseplants, pothos plants are very popular due to their easy care and tolerance of a wide range of conditions. However, it’s important to remember that they are still wild plants at heart and can cause serious damage to local ecosystems if left to grow unchecked.

Hawaiian potho plants are native to the tropical forests of French Polynesia, where they can grow to be massive plants with leaves split down the sides. If you’re growing pothos plants indoors, it’s important to keep them contained to avoid them damaging local habitats.

They love warm and humid conditions, so they are well-suited to indoor conditions. However, they can tolerate higher temperatures than some other houseplants. When grown outdoors in the right climates, pothos plants can grow to be very large, with leaves that are over a foot wide.

If you’re growing pothos plants, it’s important to remember that they are still wild plants at heart. They can cause serious damage to local ecosystems if left to grow unchecked, so it’s important to keep them contained and indoors.

Hawaiian Pothos vs. Golden Pothos

Hawaiian-pothos-vs-Golden-pothos

When it comes to choosing between Hawaiian pothos and golden pothos, plant lovers might be torn. Both plants are beautiful and easy to care for, making them popular choices for indoor gardens. So, which one is right for you? Here’s a look at the key differences between Hawaiian pothos and golden pothos:

Color: The most obvious difference between the Hawaiian pothos and the golden pothos is their color. As their names suggest, the Hawaiian pothos has green leaves with white variegation, while the golden pothos has yellow leaves with green variegation.

Appearance: Hawaiian pothos plants have variegated leaves with shades of green, yellow, and white. Golden pothos plants have solid green leaves.

Size: Hawaiian pothos plants can grow to be quite large, reaching up to 10 feet in length. Golden pothos plants are smaller, typically growing to be about 6 feet in length.

Growth rate: As we mentioned, Hawaiian pothos is a fast-growing vine while golden pothos is a slower-growing vine.

Light: The Hawaiian pothos prefers bright, indirect light, while the golden pothos prefers medium to low light.

Frequently Asked Questions:

Is Hawaiian pothos rare?

No, Hawaiian pothos is not rare. They’re actually one of the most popular houseplants, and you shouldn’t have any trouble finding them at your local nursery or garden center.
 

How does Hawaiian pothos get big leaves?

The leaves of Hawaiian pothos can get up to 12 inches long, but they’re usually a bit smaller. If you want your pothos to have big leaves, make sure it’s getting enough light and fertilizer.

Does Hawaiian pothos do well under fluorescent lights?

 
Hawaiian pothos will also do well under fluorescent lights, making them a great choice for an office or other indoor space.

At what temperature Hawaiian pothos thrive their best?

Hawaiian pothos is comfortable in a wide range of temperatures, from 60°F to 80°F. They can even tolerate brief periods of cooler temperatures, making them a good choice for a patio or porch in a cooler climate.

How often does Hawaiian Pothos need fertilizer?

Fertilizer Hawaiian pothos don’t need a lot of fertilizer, but you can give them a boost with a half-strength liquid fertilizer every month or so during the growing season. Be sure to follow the directions on the fertilizer label, and don’t overfertilize, as this can cause leaf burn